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Woodland Park Zoo - Press Release

**PHOTO OPPORTUNITY**

February 5, 2013

 

Frogs get a helping hand through a citizen “pond watch” program

 


Gigi Allianic, Caileigh Robertson
206.548.2550 | woodlandparkzoopr@zoo.org

 

Woodland Park Zoo’s volunteer watch group involves nearly 60 adults and 17 youth, including four of the zoo’s Zoo Corps teen interns. The citizen scientists will be armed with hip waders, digital cameras, GPS units and other monitoring tools for a field training session at Carkeek Park on Saturday, February 9. 

 Photo: Stan Milkowski/Woodland Park Zoo

WHAT

Frog enthusiasts and amphibian admirers alike are about to embark on a 6-month “pond watch” program that monitors eight amphibian species in wetlands throughout western Washington.

The amphibian monitoring program, which is in its second year, partners citizen scientists with Woodland Park Zoo, Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to survey amphibian egg masses in ponds and wetlands in western Washington. The project is supported by a grant from the NW Zoo & Aquarium Alliance, which promotes collaboration on regional conservation among zoos and aquariums in the Pacific Northwest.

 Woodland Park Zoo’s volunteer watch group involves nearly 60 adults and 17 youth, including four of the zoo’s Zoo Corps teen interns. Participants will be armed with hip waders, digital cameras, GPS units and other monitoring tools for a field training session at Carkeek Park where they will practice identifying and documenting the egg masses of eight different amphibian species. The volunteers already have fulfilled class training at the zoo.

After completing the field training, teams of volunteers will regularly monitor egg masses at sites in King and Snohomish counties, including several Seattle parks, through summer 2013. 

WHEN

Saturday, February 9, 10:00 a.m.-noon 

WHERE

Carkeek Park’s Wetland Trail. See attached map.

If you arrive after 10:10 am: follow the green tape and orange flags down the hill on the Wetland Trail towards the large wetland (green star on map).

WHO/VISUALS

Woodland Park Zoo and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife staff providing hands-on training for more than 60 volunteers to identify egg masses.

INFO

Eight amphibian species will be monitored under the regional program: western toad, Northwestern salamander, northern red-legged frog, Pacific tree frog, Oregon spotted frog, rough-skinned newt, long-toed salamander and American bullfrog. This project will provide critical population data, which over the long term can help determine if amphibian declines or fluctuations are occurring in this area.

The ancient class of amphibians includes salamanders, newts, an obscure group of legless creatures known as caecilians and, of course, the icons, frogs and toads. Because their skin is so permeable, amphibians are known as sentinels of the planet, signaling an early warning when something is not right in the environment.

Visit www.zoo.org for more information.

 

Accredited by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums, award-winning Woodland Park Zoo is famed for pioneering naturalistic exhibits and setting international standards for zoos in animal care, conservation and education programs. Woodland Park Zoo is helping to save animals and their habitats in the Pacific Northwest and around the world. By inspiring people to care and act, Woodland Park Zoo is making a difference in our planet’s future. For more information, visit www.zoo.org.

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Woodland Park Zoo saves animals and their habitats through conservation leadership and engaging experiences, inspiring people to learn, care and act.

 
 

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